The Unexpected Celebrityhood of the Pink Pussy Hat

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Hstorically women have worked in crafts, it is not a determination that should strictly be held to one’s identity– granted the American flag was hand sewn by a woman because a man wouldn’t let her have a proper occupation out side of the home. Femininity does not define a woman and the color pink is not in any way reclaiming a woman’s power but, it can be used as a way to silo her into another person’s assignment for her.

In other historical cultures women were both artist and warrior who used their physical, emotional  and intellectual strength to tell their stories and carry them through their battles– Scythia am I right? Should a woman not bespeak her own truth in her own time and space, with an identity that is not limited to one cultural perspective?

The movement seemed particularly significant amongst white women and although they wanted to represent all women the lack of Black and WoC was apparent. I find it strange that a Black woman is on the cover of The New Yorker wearing the hat as I didn’t see very many Black or WoC representing the “pink pussy hat” during the march. I am reminded of Journalist and Political Activist Ida B. Wells who was denied entry in the first women’s liberation march because of the color of her skin and out of the fear that her truth would disrupt the progress of “their” movement which would “lose momentum” if she was included?

Is the issue of the magazine cover actually because Black and WoC did not find solidarity in this movement? Is presenting a black woman on the cover of the magazine a true representation of the movement or does it disguise the underlying racism and segregation that is still woven in our society? — Saying and doing are two completely different things and let’s be honest, Black and WoC were not necessarily knitting with white women “back in the day”.

More often than any, Black and WoC are both consciously and subconsciously excluded from important issues or are misrepresented like in The “iconic” New Yorker cover illustration by Abigail Gray Swartz. I think that all women were not fully considered in this movement and then were imposed on by a group of WW in a way that did not truly represent “intersectional feminism” — a way in which also excluded the trans and non-binary community as well.

One would think that an intellectual debate, working their way into power or at least getting involved with the community is more monumental than to wear a pink vagina on one’s head –and let’s be honest, my pussy is brown and beautiful thank you– if you want to make a change, then start with yourself, perspective is everything and collective perspective is what a productive movement needs right now.

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